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cross-posted from: https://slrpnk.net/post/6933685

Months later, footage was released of Seattle Police Officers Guild Vice President Daniel Auderer joking about Kandula’s death over the phone with SPOG President Mike Solan.

In that recording, Auderer can be heard laughing as he referred to Kandula as “a regular person,” going on to say, “Just write a check -- $11,000, she was 26 anyway, she had limited value.”

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This video is from a couple of years ago, but I was reminded of it reading Tom's new book, Biking Uphill in the Rain. Recommended for anyone interested in Seattle history and/or biking. It definitely deserves more views!

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Two Seattle police officers have been given a day off without pay for their lackadaisical response to a priority report of a shooting at a Sodo nightclub.

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OLYMPIA — Democratic leaders in the Washington Legislature said Friday they would not act on a citizen initiative that would let Washingtonians opt out of a payroll tax that funds a state long-term care insurance program, meaning the question will very likely go directly to the November ballot.

Senate Majority Leader Andy Billig, D-Spokane, and House Speaker Laurie Jinkins, D-Tacoma, also said Friday they would hold hearings on three other citizen initiatives later this month.

Their announcement means that legislators have now laid out publicly what the next steps will be for the slate of six initiatives filed and sponsored by the state Republican Party chair, Jim Walsh, and bankrolled by Redmond businessman Brian Heywood.

With each initiative, the Legislature has several options. They could do nothing, in which case the initiative would go directly to the ballot in November. They could pass an alternative policy to appear alongside the initiative on the ballot. Or they could pass the initiative into law.

Billig and Jinkins said earlier this week that they wouldn’t hold hearings on efforts to repeal the state’s capital gains tax and its carbon market, both recently established by legislation and both big drivers of the state’s revenue growth. Altogether that means they’re not acting on three initiatives, which means those three will almost surely be go before voters, but they could act on the three others.

“The three initiatives we are not taking action on would have a dire effect on the day to day lives of every single Washingtonian,” Billig and Jinkins said in a joint statement Friday. “These initiatives would dramatically decrease quality of life and devastate progress on K-12 education, child care, clean air, clean water, climate action, and aging with dignity — matters that are important to people across the state.”

The three other initiatives that lawmakers do plan to hold public hearings on would lift some restrictions on when police can chase suspects, require parents of public school students to be able to review curriculum and be notified of their student’s medical care, and bar the state and local governments from imposing an income tax.

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Washington lawmakers are considering a bill that would limit annual rent increases to 7% for many rental properties around the state.

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Who could have foreseen that delivery drivers wouldn't actually get paid $26.40 an hour?

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Got a pack of C. Crisps from Costco two weeks ago, and they were awful. Little flavor, mealy texture. They looked beautiful, but that had zero crunch, and really bland flavor.

Figured it was a bad batch and bought another dozen from Fred Meyer. Same thing.

Is something going on in the world of apples? I get they’re not in season, but this seems extreme.

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In a recent column about riding the empty ghost trams of Seattle’s streetcar, I noted that the one in South Lake Union is costing taxpayers more than $20 per ride. I cracked: “It would have been cheaper for the city to pay for me to hire an Uber.”

One reader responded: “I’m fairly sure you were joking about the city hiring you an Uber … guess what, that’s exactly what they’re doing here in Bellevue! You should venture over to the smart side of the lake to check it out.”

It turns out it’s true. It’s not Uber specifically, but six months ago, Bellevue debuted its own downtown circulator transit service — sort of its own version of a streetcar. Only theirs is without the tracks, the trains or really any startup infrastructure expense at all.

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The survey of 1,000 Seattle voters, conducted by EMC Research in December, polled respondents on a hypothetical renewal measure for Move Seattle, a nine-year $930 million levy which funds about 30% of SDOT’s budget and expires at the end of the year. Pollsters asked about a $1.2 billion version, essentially the same amount as Move Seattle adjusted for monetary inflation, and a larger $1.7 billion package that includes more projects. While support did drop in the larger version, it was still comfortably above water, with a margin of 56% support to 43% opposition.

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